Adding an Arca-Style Foot to the Sigma 150-600mm Sports Lens

If you have a Sigma 150-600mm Sports and are looking to use it on Arca-style tripods or gimbals, here's a solution that's better than simply adding a quick release plate.

This is about as niche as they come. But if you’re in need of it, it’s a good solution.

It’s a replacement foot for the collar of the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Sports lens. On the one hand, the one I’m focusing on here is a specific replacement part for a specific lens. On the other hand, the same principle can apply to many other lenses–they just need a different model replacement part.

Some long telephoto lenses have collars that are removable. The tripod collar on the Nikon 80-400mm f/4-5.6G, for instance, can be removed. You can also swap it out with an aftermarket alternative. And that’s what I did to change the foot to be compatible with Arca-style tripod attachments.

On other lenses, like the Sigma 150-600mm, you can’t remove the collar. But what you can do is remove the foot and replace it with a different one.

The lens comes standard with a foot that has three tripod screw holes. That’s basically a universal approach–it’ll work with anything, from tripod to monopod to gimbal–but it’s also a compromise. It means that to use it with an Arca-style attachment you’ll need to add a quick release plate to the bottom. The most important negative of that is that it adds a potential weak link in terms of stability. In particular, the quick release plate can easily come loose when using with such a heavy lens, and that adds the risk of unwanted lateral rotation.

A much better alternative is to turn the foot itself into an Arca-style foot. Sigma have enabled this option by making the foot a bolt-on affair, but Sigma doesn’t offer a different foot themselves. So the other trick is finding someone who does make a replacement foot.

A Canadian company, Jobu Design, specializes in machined plates and specialized mounts. They make exactly the kind of foot I was after. Its model number is LF-S156S. It’s not inexpensive–it’s close to a custom accessory, after all–but in the context of the cost of the lens it’s not that much.

Here are some photos to show how it works.

This is the replacement foot itself. It’s a single piece of machined aluminum.

As you can see, it’s significantly longer than the default foot for this lens. That’s to help with balance when using on a gimbal. It’s also a little deeper.

These are four hex screws that need to come out.

Something you’ll notice is that screws are two different lengths. That’s a deliberate design feature on Sigma’s part–it’s not a mistake.

This is the exposed area on the lens when you take the foot off.

With the new foot attached, you’ll notice that, again, the screws don’t all go to the same depth. Again, that’s deliberate. (All four screws are actually the same length–it’s the depth of the screw holes that varies.)

In Use

Overall, I’ve found it to work well. It’s stable and solid.

My only quibble with it is that because it’s so long it can require some working around to rotate the zoom ring. That’s not really an issue if you have it on a tripod or monopod. But if you’re shooting handheld with your left hand under the lens, it’s a bit of extra reach with your fingers around the foot to reach the ring. It’s not a big issue, but it is something added by the foot.

Comes With

  • Replacement Foot (LF-S156S)
  • 2 x 4-40 Safety Screws (pre-installed)
  • 3/32″ Hex Wrench
  • M3 Hex Wrench
  • Limited 5-Year Warranty

It’s made in Canada.

It does not come with new screws to use to attach the foot–you have to reuse the ones already on the lens.

Where to Buy

I bought mine directly from Jobu Design and had it shipped from Canada. It was only later that I realized they’re also available at B&H Photo.

It’s sometimes possible to find them used.

View Comments

  • Hello, great article. Now Sigma has a replacement foot, the TS-81 which is very expensive, big and heavy. Also you have other brands like the SUNWAYFOTO lf-m1, which is the cheapest, but a bit short.
    For the last, there is the Wimberley AP-608, which seems to me a good solution, not so large or small, intermediate pricing too, but heavier than I would have liked.
    If you put the Jobu showed in the pictures, you have a lot of options for the Sigma 150-600 Sport lens. All of them are also compatible with the new Sigma 500 f4 Sport lens.
    I'm curious about the Jobu... wonder if it would allow to reverse the hood using a lenscoat on. And if it is comfortable to use with a monopode when you try to operate the zoom ring.
    Thanks for sharing this!

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