Lumix S 24-105mm ƒ/4 Zoom Lens Sample Images

I've recently been out shooting with the new Lumix S 24-105mm ƒ/4 on the also-new Lumix S1 full-frame mirrorless camera. Here are some images taken with the combination with an emphasis on examples showing how the lens performs in real-world shooting.

I’ve recently been out shooting with the new Lumix S1 full-frame mirrorless camera. I’ve been using the Lumix S 24-105mm ƒ/4 with it. This is a new model, and I thought it worth posting some images taken with it in case anyone is curious how it performs in real-world shooting. It’s an L mount lens, a system that’s co-developed by Leica, Lumix, and Sigma. So you’re not limited to using it only on Lumix camera bodies.

First, though, a quick rundown of key specs: It’s an autofocus lens with built-in optical image stabilization. It has a fixed maximum aperture of ƒ/4 throughout the zoom range and a minimum aperture of ƒ/22. The angle of view on a full-frame sensor–the most logical sensor to use this lens on–is 84° at its widest and 23° when zoomed in to 105mm. It’s also a macro lens, with a reproduction ratio of 1:2 and a minimum focusing distance of just under 12 inches (30 cm).

It’s worth noting something important that effects the images you see here. Lenses have been moving away from dumb pieces of glass for years now. Autofocus and electronic aperture controls were some of the first ways that lenses became digitized. Sigma even has a system that lets you tweak the settings of some of its lenses. And some, like this one, use digital profile corrections that are applied to JPGs and embedded into the RAW files. These corrections are applied automatically and address things like lens vignetting, chromatic aberration, and barrel distortion. If you’re familiar with applying lens profiles in Lightroom, you’ve traditionally had to choose that option; with these newer lenses, the corrections are applied automatically and the profile itself is embedded in the RAW files. That applies to all the images here–the embedded profile corrections are masking any optical flaws the glass might have. I haven’t found a way to turn this off with the S1, but I’m not sure of any standard use cases where there’d be any practical value to doing so beyond some niche arguments for a lens’s “character.” But since I’m most interested in looking at the practical results in real-world shooting than lab tests of the optical quality of the glass elements themselves, that’s fine with me.

After shooting with the Lumix S 24-105mm ƒ/4 for a while, I’m very impressed. It’s an easy lens to shoot with, especially for something like travel photography, the optical image stabilization works well, there are few gotcha flaws that show up in the image quality, and the images are tack sharp. While I have some quibbles with the S1’s autofocus, those are to do with the camera’s detection, not with the lens. And while I’d love for this to be a ƒ/2.8 lens, that’s just asking it to be something it isn’t. But accepting the lens for what it is–a moderately fast but sharp zoom lens with a highly versatile focal length range–I have to say that I think Lumix has nailed it with this one.

I’ve previously posted some practical examples of this lens’s zoom range here.

Sample Images Taken with the Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro O.I.S. Lens

So here are some high-resolution sample images I’ve taken with the Lumix S 24-105mm f/4. I’ve tried to include shots that bring in a wide range of aspects that apply to shooting with a lens, particularly for general travel photography. So there are some challenging lighting conditions, including pointing straight at bright light sources. There are straight lines. There are different focus depths and distances. There are shots with fine details and smooth tones in different parts of the frame. And there’s a variety of apertures and focal lengths.

These were all shot on the S1 in RAW. They’ve been run through Lightroom, but most of them have had only a very light processing touch. What I haven’t applied to any of them is any lens corrections beyond the default embedded ones.

I’ve included the aperture and focal length for each one in its caption, and you can click on each image to get a full-size version for a closer look.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 73mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 86mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 63mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/5.6 and zoomed to 26mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/6.3 and zoomed to 26mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/9.0 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/9.0 and zoomed to 105mm. As with most of the shots on this page, I took this to test both the camera and the lens. In this case, the subtle shading for the camera sensor and the straight lines and sharpness of the lens (look for the thin wires running along as railing for the pier).

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm. Testing bokeh, especially against some bright light.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/8 and zoomed to 50mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/16 and zoomed to 31mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 105mm. The sharp contrasts in the top make for a good test for provoking chromatic aberration.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 105mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/5.0 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 35mm. This was shot with a polarizing filter.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 37mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm. Showing the bokeh and depth of field at the widest setting.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/9.0 and zoomed to 46mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/7.1 and zoomed to 51mm. Another close focusing shot at the widest aperture.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/10 and zoomed to 92mm. There’s no real issue with vignetting after the built-in lens correction has been automatically applied.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 43mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/16 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/13 and zoomed to 52mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 43mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/6.3 and zoomed to 61mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm. Another shot using a polarizing filter.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 89mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 40mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 105mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 105mm. A good test of corner sharpness, with the bricks of the Washington Monument in top and bottom right and the flags at bottom left.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 26mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 105mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 48mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/6.3 and zoomed to 105mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 34mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/8 and zoomed to 36mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/5.6 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/6.3 and zoomed to 42mm. Some close focusing. The lens has a minimum focusing distance of 11.81 inches (30 cm).

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 56mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 25mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/8 and zoomed to 40mm. This is a shot I often take to show up any barrel distortion. There’s none really here to speak of, although it’s not clear how much of that is optical and how much the result of the lens’s profile corrections.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 51mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/11 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/6.3 and zoomed to 24mm. Another shot directly at the sun to see what kind of flaring occurred.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 38mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 24mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 31mm.

Taken with an aperture of ƒ/4 and zoomed to 83mm.

Where to Find It

You can find the Lumix S 24-105mm ƒ/4 at B&H Photo for $1298.

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