Sony a6400 High ISO Sample Images

Here's a collection of photos I've taken with the Sony Alpha a6400 mirrorless camera using high ISOs from ISO 6400 up through ISO 102400.

I’ve lately been out shooting with the new Sony a6400 mirrorless camera, the latest in the smaller APS-C cropped mirrorless cameras in the Sony Alpha range (they also have full-frame cameras in the Alpha range, such as the a7r III).

It has a 24.2 MP APS-C Exmor CMOS sensor and Sony’s BIONZ X on-board image processor. It’s an incremental release that slots in easily within the existing range of a6000, a6300, and a6500 cameras. If you’ve used one of those cameras–or, indeed, any of the recent Alpha cameras–the a6400 is going to feel instantly familiar.

I’ll be posting separately a detailed hands-on review and a more expansive set of sample images I’ve shot with the a6400. I’ve also posted side-by-side images shot across the entire spectrum of the a6400’s available ISO range from 100 through 102400.

What I’m focusing on here is the high-ISO performance when shooting photos in low light. Because as much as I like a good travel tripod, most of the time I find myself shooting hand-held. Specifically, I’m looking at images shot within the ISO range from 6400 up to 102400. Because not all of the available ISOs within that range are of the same kind, I’ve divided it up below into two groups: native ISO and extended ISO.

Native ISO vs Extended ISO

For still photos, the Sony a6400 has an ISO range from 100 through 102400. But not all of that range is equally useful. That’s because there’s a difference between the sensor’s “true” ISO range–also known as native ISO range–that’s down to the responsiveness of the sensor itself. The native ISO range of the Sony a6400 is 100 through 32000.

To get the ISO sensitivity above that, you need to tap into the extended ISO range, where the where software takes over to boost the signal and cleans up the image. In practice, the image quality drops off markedly in the extended range, but if it means the difference between getting the shot and not getting the shot, that might be something you’re willing to live with. Or maybe you like that look or are converting it to monochrome, which is a common way to mask some of the image quality flaws.

If you are shooting in that extended range, I’ve found that the camera’s own processing of JPGs does as good a job or even better than is easily accomplished through post-processing the RAW files. I normally shoot RAW, but this is one time where it’s often worth switching to JPG (or, better yet, using the RAW+JPG setting).

Examples of High ISO Images Taken with the Sony a6400

So here are some shots I’ve taken with the a6400 using ISO 6400 up through ISO 102400. These were all taken with the Sony 18-135mm ƒ/3.5-5.6 E-Mount lens, which I’ve been testing out at the same time.

The camera has in-camera noise reduction processing when shooting JPG images. That processing is also applied to the JPG thumbnail previews that are saved within the RAW file, but it doesn’t affect the underlying RAW data. The higher the ISO, the more aggressive the in-camera noise reduction is by default. But for these examples, I’m bypassing that by regenerating the JPGs directly from the RAW image. And I’m applying very little in the way of noise reduction–in fact, for these, I haven’t added anything beyond Lightroom’s default, which is quite a light touch. That makes it easier to compare apples to apples for the purposes here, but it also leaves quite a lot of room for post-processing noise reduction if you’re so inclined.

Native ISO Range: 6400 to 32000

These photos were shot within the a6400 sensor’s native ISO range of 6400 through 32000. You can click on each image to open a full-size version for a closer look.

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 12800

ISO 32000

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 32000

ISO 32000

ISO 12800

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 6400

ISO 16000

ISO 32000

ISO 32000

ISO 25600

ISO 20000

ISO 6400

ISO 25600

ISO 10000

ISO 6400

ISO 12800

ISO 10000

Extended ISO Range: 40000 to 102400

These photos were shot within the a6400 extended ISO range of 40000 through 102400. It’s worth noting that

ISO 102400

ISO 51200

ISO 64000

ISO 102400

ISO 64000

ISO 51200

ISO 51200

ISO 51200

ISO 102400

ISO 80000

ISO 51200

ISO 40000

ISO 80000

ISO 40000

Where to Find the Sony a6400

You can find the Sony a6400 at Amazon and B&H Photo and Google Shopping.

It’s available in a few different configurations, ranging from body only to bundled with either a 16-50mm zoom lens or a 18-135mm zoom lens. You can also find good deals that include a bunch of accessories.

Images and product information from Amazon PA-API were last updated on 2020-05-26 at 20:19. Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon Site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

View Comments

  • Cool photos and presentation, David. I find the photos shot on 6400 ISO to be totally fine. I'm not a pixel-peeper anyway, but I don't want to see loads of noise either. I think that beyond 12800 it's really noticeable but for basic purposes still usable. For higher ISOs (80K, 100K, etc) the results are okay. However, I think I wouldn't use them unless it was some very special photographic report that requested all available images.
    I've been also using a Sony, the a6300, but I mainly try its video capabilities. While I'm satisfied by the photos I can get with the kit lens, I still can't leave my Ricoh GR ii behind. Did you use any prime lenses with the a6000 series cameras? I 'd love to see Sony releasing a 23mm 1.8 or 1.4 for its APS-C cameras (an equivalent of 35 mm in full frames).
    Cheers,
    George

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