Our Lady of Pilar Basilica

Despite a checkered history, Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires has survived as the second oldest church in Buenos Aires and looking none the worse for wear.
This post may include affiliate links.
Click here for more information.

Despite a checkered history, Our Lady of Pilar Basilica has survived as the second oldest church in Buenos Aires and looking none the worse for wear.

The initiative for building the church came from two local entrepreneurs. The first, Pedro de Bustinza, from Sante Fe, Argentina, secured authorization from the King Philip V of Spain in 1705 to build the church. King Philip authorized the construction with a crucial caveat: Bustinza would have to fund the full cost of the construction himself. Bustinza agreed, but died a year later, before he could see the funds raised. His cause was taken up by a local Spanish-born merchant, Juan de Narbona, who donated the first $20,000 (pesos). Two Jesuit architects who had overseen a number of other prominent Buenos Aires churches were recruited to build the church. It was Narbona who gave the church its name. Our Lady of Pilar was the patroness saint of Zaragoza, Spain, where he was born.

When the order of the Recollections (Recoletos) fell out of favor in the early 19th century, the complex was seized by the government and used as municipal property. By 1936 it was again back under church control, when Pope Pius XI declared it a basilica. And in 1942 it was declared a National Historical Monument.

The main nave is ornate in the Spanish-colonial style with a massive, ornate reredos behind the altar. Both the exterior and the interior are unusually well kept, suggesting that funding for upkeep has been secure in recent times (unlike many other churches).

But the real gem of Our Lady of Pilar Basilica is off through a small door at the left of the nave: access to the cloisters. These are the oldest part of the original church and date back to the period 1715 to 1720. These were originally off-limits to the public, but in 1997 they were opened up to visitors.

The cloisters now house a small, three-level museum devoted to religious art with artworks from the church as well as small carved and ornately dressed religious figurines, valuable silver, and a small exhibit on Gregorian chants.

The walls and arched ceilings are of brick painted with lime. Some hinges, door, and window fasteners as well as the alabaster used in those days instead of glass, are also the original ones.

The windows once looked out over the church’s orchard. Now they look directly into the lavishly decorated above-ground cemetery that is the final resting place of Argentine notables: La Recoleta Cemetery.

Photos of Our Lady of Pilar Basilica

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Buenos Aires Agentina

Map

Where to Next?

Guidebooks for Argentina

If you're looking for a guidebook to make the most of your visit, these are some of the most popular ones currently for Argentina. Some are available in both paper and e-book formats.

Lonely Planet Argentina 11 (Country Guide)
158 Reviews
Lonely Planet Argentina 11 (Country Guide)
  • Albiston, Isabel (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
Fodor's Essential Argentina: with the Wine Country, Uruguay & Chilean...
81 Reviews
Fodor's Essential Argentina: with the Wine Country, Uruguay & Chilean...
  • Fodor's Travel Guides (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
DK Eyewitness Argentina (Travel Guide)
85 Reviews
DK Eyewitness Argentina (Travel Guide)
  • EYEWITNESS
  • DK Eyewitness (Author)
Argentina (National Geographic Adventure Map, 3400)
80 Reviews
Argentina (National Geographic Adventure Map, 3400)
  • Printed on waterproof material.
  • Tear resistant.

Travel Insurance For Your Trip to Argentina

I never travel without travel insurance, and I've run into several situations where I've had to make claims. I consider it essential.

But shopping for travel insurance can be a pain and confusing. Thankfully, there are some travel insurance comparison sites that show you a wide range of plans, make it easy to compare coverage, and can save you money at the same time. And the coverage can be much better tailored to your specific needs than the checkbox offering at travel booking sites or through your credit card.

These are some good places to shop for travel insurance for your next trip to Argentina :

Hopefully, you won't need it, but if something goes wrong, you'll sure be glad you have it!

Location
On This Page