How to Recover Photos from a Memory Card with Remo Recover

If you the photos on your memory card have disappeared, all is not necessarily lost. Remo Recovery is one of several apps that might be able to salvage them.
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If you the photos on your memory card have disappeared, all is not necessarily lost. Depending on the precise cause of the problem it might well be possible to recover some or all of your photos from the card even if you’ve accidentally deleted them or reformatted the card. Things get a bit more touch and go if there’s physical damage to the card or bad sectors, but it can be surprising how often something can be salvaged.

I’ve written before about various apps for recovering photos from memory cards and reviewed some of the options in depth, such as Stellar Phoenix Photo Recovery and PhotoRec. Some of them are free, but most of the ones that have a good combination of user friendliness and functionality are paid apps.

I’m focusing here on one of those paid apps: Remo Recover. I’m using the Mac version here. It’s also available in Windows.

Basic Usage

When you first fire it up you’ll get the choice of three different versions. The Recover Files option is the Basic edition. While that’s also the cheapest, I’m going to ignore it here because it cannot recover RAW files. But if you’re shooting exclusively in JPG format, the Basic edition might work well for you. The Recover Photos is the one I’m going to use here, which is the Media edition. The Pro edition allows you to recover volumes or drives, but that’s well beyond the scope of what I’m looking at here.

Remo Recover 1

It’s also worth noting that while it says “photos,” it also works with video and audio files.

You’ll then get the choice between recovering deleted photos and recovering lost photos. The “Recover Deleted Photos” option is a straightforward undelete function. The “Recover Lost Photos” is the one you’d use for more serious problems and is the one I’m going to focus on here.

Remo Recover 2

Next is where you select which memory card or drive you want to work with. All of your connected drives should show up here, including your internal or external hard drives. You want to scroll through until you find the one that corresponds to your memory card. In this case, you can see that the reader device (Lexar Workflow CCFR1) is also listed, with the memory card underneath it.

Remo Recover 3

And then you can select what files to look for. By default, all the available options are selected, but you can also select a subset to help speed things up. In this case, I’m looking only for Nikon NEF RAW files.

Remo Recover 6

It’ll then do its thing, giving you a detailed progress panel:

Remo Recover 7

And once it’s done, there’s a list of the files that can be salvaged.

Remo Recover 8

It’s here that things become a little less rosy. It’s nothing to do with the fundamental performance of the app in terms of finding and recovering lost files. The big thing is that the preview function is spotty.

For every NEF file I’ve tried to preview I get text, mostly gibberish, in place of an image. The popup lists several possible reasons for that: if the file is damaged, it’s an unsupported file type or the file’s size is larger than the previewer limit. In all the cases I came across, the last one appears to have been the culprit, and that is presumably something that the app’s developers can do something about.

It’s one thing not to have a preview available, but the text gibberish seems to imply that there’s no image there to recover. But that’s often not the case, and if you go through with the recover the file can, in fact, be recovered. So the preview function sows doubt unnecessarily. It’s also a problem if you’re evaluating the program to see what can be recovered before forking out for the license to do the actual recovery. Without a proper preview, it’s impossible to be confident that the app is going to be able to recover the images you want to review.

Remo Recover 9

This was an issue I ran into with large RAW files–JPGs previewed normally.

Remo Recover 10

The results also aren’t as straightforward to use as in some other apps like Stellar Phoenix Photo Recovery. For one thing, it splits up the RAW file and the embedded preview. There’s nothing inherently wrong with that, and in fact, it can be a virtue if you’re trying to salvage at least something from a corrupted RAW file. But it does mean that it’s possible to accidentally recover the wrong version.

Advanced Options

You can also specify only a specific region of the source media to focus on. This is helpful for bypassing bad sectors that might otherwise cause things to hang.

Remo Recover 11

File Types Compatibility

There are three versions of Remo Recover each for Windows and Mac. The Basic version doesn’t work with RAW files, so I’m focusing here on the Media Edition, which does. At the time of writing, these are the RAW file types that it identifies as being compatible with:

File ExtensionVideo Type
ARWSony
SR2Sony
KDCKodak
K25Kodak
DCRKodak
PEFPentax
DNGAdobe Digital Negative
CR2Canon
NEFNikon
ORFOlympus
RAWPanasonic & Leica
3FRHasselblad
CRWCanon
RAFFujifilm
MRWMinolta
X3FSigma

In addition, it works with BMP, JPEG/JPG, GIF, PNG, TIFF, and PSD formats as well as a range of audio and video file formats.

Miscellaneous Notes

  • The Windows versions of are significantly cheaper than the corresponding Mac versions and each offers specific features related to the operating system or major integrated apps like iTunes. Each also has different features in terms of the file systems it can work with. The Mac version can work with HFS, HFS+, FAT16 and FAT32. The Windows version can work with FAT12, FAT16, FAT32, ExFAT, NTFS, NTFS5, and RAID0, RAID1, RAID 5 partitions.
  • Like Stellar Data Recovery, Remo offers options to repair some types of damaged files, but they offer it in separate apps that require their own licenses. You can find details about them here.

Wrap Up

There are a lot of data recovery apps available, and there are quite a few that focus on photos and media files. Some are free, and some are paid apps. Functionally, many of them lead to the same result, but some of them are better than others in terms of the user interface and being user-friendly.

I found Remo Recover to be pretty similar in use and price to Stellar Phoenix Photo Recovery, although I think Stellar’s offering is more user-friendly. If you’re looking for a free option, PhotoRec works well and is very powerful, but the catch is that it’s not particularly user-friendly. I have a guide to using it here.

Remo Recover’s underlying functionality is good. It find and recovers deleted files well, even from cards that have been formatted in the camera. But it could do with improvement with respect to user friendliness. The unreliable preview function, in particular, could be improved if only so that it can provide an accurate assessment of what’s recoverable before users put down their cash for a license.

As with any of the data recovery apps that have the option, I recommend running a scan in trial mode to try to see what it can recover before you buy a license.

You can download Remo Recover here. There are versions for Windows, Mac, and Android.

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8 Responses

  1. Some of my recovered pictures are not complete – I only see part of the image. When I preview, it shows two Ts. A couple other pictures are one partial image on top and another on the bottom. Is there anything I can do to recover these pictures?

  2. Hi….why an event or party recorded….when you watch what tou have recorded….you get sort of briken pictures?

    1. You’ll have to explain a bit more what you mean by “broken pictures,” but at least some types of that are due to corrupted files. There are a number of things that can cause that, including faulty gear, corrupted files when the data was being written, or a corrupted storage device (memory card). If it’s happening often, the first thing I try is to swap out the memory card. If it’s still happening often, it suggests a problem with the way that the camera is writing the data to the card, which might mean a fault in the camera itself.

  3. Hi
    I was watching a tutorial on my canon 80d and I formatted my sd card twice not knowing it would erase all my pictures. Can they still be recovered?

    1. There’s a good chance, so long as you haven’t saved any more photos to the card. Usually the formatting doesn’t fully wipe them off so the data recovery apps can work their magic.

    1. It would depend how they’re hidden. If they’re renamed or some other trick to hide them from the operating system, the apps you’ve tried probably can’t see them because they’re looking for a limited set of file types. There are apps like PhotoRec that will find everything, regardless of file type, but it’s not as user friendly (but is free). I have a guide to using PhotoRec here. But if the data is actually encrypted rather than just not showing, there’s most likely no practical way to recover them without the decryption key.

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