How to Export a Single Frame as a JPG from Adobe Premiere Pro

There are two methods for exporting an individual frame from a Premiere Pro project. One is quick and simple but doesn’t give you much control. The other involves more steps but gives you more control over things like size and compression amount.

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There are two methods for exporting a single frame image from a video clip in Premiere Pro.

One is quick and simple but doesn’t give you much control. The other involves more steps, but it also gives you more control over things like size and compression amount.

I’m going to show how to do both methods, starting with the quick and simple option.

Method 1: Quick & Simple Way to Export a Frame in Premiere Pro

This is the quickest method for exporting a single frame from a video as a JPG using Adobe Premiere Pro. The downside is that it doesn’t give you much control over the output.

1. Position the playhead on the frame you want to export

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 1

2. Press the keyboard shortcut SHIFT + E or click on the camera icon

The icon doesn’t exactly leap out at you. Here’s where to find it.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 4

3. Set export settings

You’ll then get a small export frame dialog box. You don’t have a lot of options here, but you can choose the filename and where to save it.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 2

You can also choose the file format. There’s the option of JPG, DPX, OpenEXR, PNG, Targa, and TIFF. You don’t have any control over the amount of compression, etc.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 3

Method 2: More Control Over Frame Output When You Export a Still from Premiere Pro

There’s also another way to export a single still frame from a project. It gives you far more control but is also more convoluted.

1. Position the playhead on the frame you want to export.

You can technically do this later, but I find that the control is a bit more precise here.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 1

2. Open the Media Export dialog by either using the keyboard shortcut CMD-M (Mac) or CTRL-M (Windows).

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 5

You can, if you prefer, use the timeline under the preview to position the playhead on the frame you want to export. It automatically goes to the frame you’ve chosen in the main timeline, but you can change it here if you like.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 6

3. In the Export Settings at the top right, choose the image format

If you can’t see these options, click on the small arrow to the left of “Export Settings” to expand the panel.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 7

It should automatically check the “Export Video” box, but in case it hasn’t, check that. The “Export Audio” option that’s usually there for exporting video will be unavailable for obvious reasons.

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 8

If you want to set the filename of the exported file, click on the “Output Name” filename that should be bright blue.

4. Choose the Video tab and expand the Basic Settings panel

Premiere Pro CC Export Frame as JPG 9

There are three main things to set here:

  • Quality. Use the slider to choose the compression/quality for the exported file if you’re using a compressed format like JPG. The slider isn’t there for other formats like TIFF—there’s no option to choose TIFF compression, for example.
  • Size. If you check the box to the right, it will automatically match the size of the source. If you uncheck that box, you can specify a width and height. If the small chain link icon just to the right of the width and height is enabled, it will maintain the aspect ratio. That is, when that’s enabled, if you change one, it’ll automatically change the other to maintain the same aspect ratio. You can also uncheck that small chain link icon which uncouples the width and height. That is, you can set the width and height independently to stretch in one direction or another.
  • Export As Sequence. This is an important one to remember. If this option is checked, it will export every frame from the project as an individual image file, so you’ll end up with hundreds or even many thousands of individual files in a sequence. To export a single frame, uncheck this option. The single image is selected according to the playhead on the timeline, not the first frame of the project.

There are two more options: aspect (referring to video aspect, not the aspect ratio of the finished image) and render at maximum depth. In most cases, you can ignore those for this purpose.

5. Export

To export immediately, hit the Export button. To enqueue with other export jobs, hit the Queue button.

8 thoughts on “How to Export a Single Frame as a JPG from Adobe Premiere Pro”

  1. Why is it that when I follow this tutorial, the image I get is never where I put the playhead? It’s always the first frame of the video instead. It also completely ignores the dimensions I had asked for.

    Reply
  2. If ONLY I had read this FIRST! I accidentally implemented the “export as Sequence” command and now have thousands of .JPEG thumbnails on my desktop instead of the ONE I wanted. I must look before leaping but as usual I was in a hurry and hadn’t done the thumbnail export before, missed the “export sequence” setting, and now have a major FUBAR situation. Doing my best to recover a computer which is angry with me for effing up. THANK you for your post!

    Reply
    • Ah, yes. Been there. More than once I’ve had to pull the plug out of the back of the computer to stop an accidental massive batch operation. Hope you’ve got it sorted now. :)

      Reply
  3. Thank you. This was very helpful. I needed to export higher resolution stills. Sometimes with the second method, I get an all black jpeg. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  4. Hi,

    How do you export a still from a sequence with an anamorphic pixel ratio so it has a square pixel ratio? If you export using the method above, it exports squashed. Thanks!

    Reply
  5. Thank you so much for this resource. It is difficult to find basic answers like this on Creative Cow because people really like to talk down to you and dodge your question, as opposed to just answering it.

    Reply

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